Nov 9, 2017

Tinka Tinka Awards on Webdunia



Tinka Tinka India Awards, TOI Bareilly

Tinka Tinka Awards, 2016

Tinka Tinka India Awards, Ghaziabad



Guest Lecture with Dr. Ambrish Saxena at Lady Shri Ram College For Women


Dr. Ambrish Saxena at the lecture
The Department of Journalism hosted a guest lecture on 3rd November, 2017, conducted by Dr. Ambrish Saxena, Head, Department of Journalism for Zee Academic Institute, Noida. Dr. Saxena has served as a journalist with three prominent dailies including The Pioneer and three Hindi Newspapers including Aaj Tak. The lecture was organized on ‘The Patterns of State Ownership in Radio’.
The session started with Dr. Saxena touching upon some of the basics of Journalism, the first being that as a journalism student, one should be exposed to all mediums, extensively, and that change in technology has increased mediums for dissemination of information, however, every medium has its own advantages and one cannot substitute the other, only supplement it.  He then went on to talk about the contemporary era as an era of convergence, and adding to this, he gave the example of ‘Integrated News Rooms’ that may be understood as a central point that cater to a channels- Television, Newspaper, Radio and Digital Mediums, all from one central newsroom.  
Elucidating on the distinction between Digital and Social Media, Dr. Saxena said that on one hand, where Conventional Mediums have gatekeepers, including the digital websites/applications curated by Media Houses, the news aired by these channels/mediums may be considered valid with due verification. On the other hand, there is social media that is unregulated with the absence of a gatekeeper, and hence cannot be relied on completely without checking the authenticity of the same. For example, he talked about facebook and whatsapp, and how it is easy to circulate information on these mediums without any gatekeepers. He then emphasized on the need for attribution, and said that news without attribution should not be trusted. And as a journalist, one must check the source of the news before trusting it.
Dr. Vartika Nanda, speaking at the lecture

News, in the 21st century is so live, that there is a tough competition and every second counts. The Television medium fights for (a) speed and (b) reliability. Radio,  as explained by Dr. Saxena, traces its roots back to 1926, when proper broadcasting began. However, the Indian Policy concerning Radio Broadcasting does not permit news broadcasting by radio channels.  The radio was in control of the government (Information and broadcasting Ministry) until 1997.  Talking about the emergency period, he highlighted how AIR & DD, were misused by the government, and hence a need was felt for the autonomy of these organs. The Congress government, as explained by Dr. Saxena, was in favor of controlling electronic media under the umbrella of ‘National Interest’, and the Opposition wanted the bodies to be autonomous. After multiple proposals and rejections, the bill for autonomy of these organs was passed by a Non-congress government in 1997, almost 20 years after the first introduction of the bill in the parliament. Then, Prasar Bharati was established, independent from the government, which took over AIR (All India Radio) and DD (Doordarshan). 


The lecture proceeded with Dr. Saxena making the students realize the void that the absence of a Broadcasting Bill created in our country. He stated that in 1997, the government of India created the draft for the Broadcasting Bill, however, the bill hasn’t been passed until present day. As a result of this, policy making in radio is still ad-hoc, but in lieu of the same, TRAI (Telecom Regulatory Authority of India) has made a significant difference. It regulates broadband, satellite connections, Radio, Telecom ( Cable & wireless networks) etc. and has been pursuing the government to allow private Radio channels to broadcast news independently, however, the private players are only permitted to re-run the news bulletins aired by All India Radio. The request is denied on the basis that frequencies pose a threat to National Security and hence Prasar Bharati enjoys monopoly over News Broadcasting and Current Affairs Programmes broadcasted on all radio channels.


Talking about the structure of news in the three conventional mediums, i.e; Print, Radio and Television; Dr. Saxena made clear distinctions in their structure and format. A reporter, writing for the print medium must remember that the story is only meant for reading and must follow the inverted pyramid structure. Referring to the 70’s and 80’s, he said that the only attribution given to newspaper articles was ‘By Correspondent’ or ‘By Staff Reporter’, and no names were used, as the media houses believed the credibility of the newspaper to be above the reporter writing for it. Today, however, the print medium has adopted from the Television medium -  the feature of using names, and so, all newspaper articles attribute the name of the reporter covering the news story as well as their email id, which not only establishes a two-way connection between the reader and reporter, but also adds authenticity and accountability to the report.
Unlike Print, a Radio story is carried by two persons- (1) The reporter covering it, and (2) The anchor/news presenter. Hence, its structure is different from that of the print medium and is divided into 3 parts: (a) Anchor Piece, (b) Bites, and (c) Voice Cast. In 2001, AIR decided to introduce a new format in radio news, which was to use the voice of the correspondent while presenting news bulletins, and launched ‘FM Gold’, the channel identity being Bollywood songs and news and current affairs.  The advantages of this medium as compared to Television, as highlighted by Dr. Saxena, are that it doesn’t require the reporter to go to any external spot, and voice cast can be recorder from the studio,  by simply calling the reporter.
Television, much like radio, has 3 parts of production: (a) Anchor Piece, (b) Bites, and (c) Piece to camera. After the inception of Television, as talked about by Dr. Saxena, Radio became obsolete and it’s listenership dropped drastically. In the Television medium, ‘Piece to camera’ is of utmost importance for the viewer to be able to relate to the reporter. Receptivity is strong as the news is coming directly from the reporter and the backdrop of this piece is usually the spot where the event has occurred.
Dr. Saxena then opened the floor to questions and a few students from the second and third year batch asked relevant questions. In his concluding statement, Dr. Saxena touched upon the need for curating content that delivers to the target audience while at the same time following journalistic ethics.
-Written By Paridhi Bhanot, Student of LSR
Suggested Readings:


Media Theory



Name of the book

Author

Publisher

Year

  Link to the PDF
A Hand Book for Journalists
M V Kamath
Vikas
2007
Companion to Media Studies
Angharod Valdivia -
Blackwell Publishers
2004
Communication for Development
Melkote and Steeves
SAGE
2001
India's Communication Revolution
Singhal and Rogers
SAGE
2001
Understanding Media
Marshall McLuhan
Routledge
2001
Mass Communication Theory
Denis McQuail
SAGE
2001
India's Newspaper Revolution
Robin Jeffery
Oxford University Press
2000
Manufacturing Consent
Herman and Chomsky
Pantheon Books
1988
The Global Media
Herman and McChesney
GDN
1997
Here is the News
Rangaswamy Parthasarathy
Sterling Publishers
1994
History of Indian Journalism
J. Natrajan
Publications Divisions, Ministry of I&B, Government of India
1997
The Press in India
G N S Ragahvan
Gyan books
1994
Mass Media and Cross Cultural Communication
S.R. Joshi and Bela Trivedi
Indian Space Research Organization
1994
The Indian Media Business
Vanita Kohli
SAGE
2006
Mass Communication and Journalism in India
D.S. Mehta



Allied
1992
Whose News? The Media and Women
Ammu Joseph and Kalpana Sharma
SAGE
1996
Image Journeys
Christiane Brosius and Melissa Butcher
Sage
1999
Being in the World
Jonathan Friedman
Sage
1990

Broadcast Media


Television in India
Nalin Mehta
Routledge
2008
India on Television
Nalin Mehta
Harper Collins
2008
News and Entertainment
Daya Kishan Thussu
SAGE
2007
Advanced Journalism
Adarsh Kumar Varma
Har Anand Publications
2000
Satellite Invasion in India
S. C. Bhatt
Gyan books
1994
Broadcasting in India
G.C. Awasthy
Allied
1965
Broadcasting In India
P C Chatterji,
SAGE
1991
Satellites Over South Asia: Broadcasting, Culture and the Public Interest
David Page, William Crawley
SAGE
2001
Television in India: Changes and Challenges
Gopal Saxena
Vikas
1996
Television Handbook
Patricia Holland
Routledge
1997
Indian Broadcasting
H.R.Luthra
Publications Division
1986
Watching Dallas
Iena Ang
Methuen
1985
This is All India Radio
U L Baruah
Publications Divisions, Ministry of I&B Government of India
1983
The Radio Handbook
Carole Fleming
Routledge
2002
Radio Journalism
Guy Starkey  & Crisell
SAGE
2009
The Practical Media Dictionary
Jeremy Orlebar
Arnold
2003


Online Journalism


Online Journalism
Jim Hall
Pluto
2001
Web Production
Jason Whitmaker
Routledge
2001



Media Ethics and Press Laws




Law of the Press
D D Basu
Prentice Hall
1986
The Press
M Chalapati Rao
National Book Trust
1974

Media Management


The Fundamentals of Marketing
Edward Russell
Ava Publishing
2009
Marketing of Newspapers
R Padmaja
Kanishka
2008
Strategic Management in the Media
Lucy Kung
SAGE
2008
Media and Communication Management
C S. Rayudu



Himalaya
2003
Newspaper Management in India
Gulab Kothari
Rajasthan Patrika Limited
2000


Media and Politics


Headlines From The Hindi Heartland
Sevanti Ninan
Sage
2007
Women Heroes and Dalit Assertion in North India
Badri Narayan
Sage
2006
The Argumentative Indian
Amartya Sen
Penguin
2005
Dalit Diary
Chandra Bhan Prasad
Navayana
2004
De-constructing the nation
Andrew and Vernon Hewitt
Oxford University Press
2004
Media Reform: Democratizing the media and democratizing the state
Beata Rozumilowicz
Routledge
2002
Politics After Television
Arvind Rajagopal
Cambridge University Press
2001
Need for News Service
Kanshi Ram
Bahujan Samaj Publications
1997
Rethinking The Public Sphere
Nancy Fraser
Cambridge
1992
Rethinking The Public Sphere
Nancy Fraser
Cambridge
1992
Rethinking The Public Sphere
Nancy Fraser
Cambridge
1992
Scheduled Castes
O.P. Sharma
Kar Kripa
1990


Photography


Complete Idiot’s Guide to Digital Photography
Steve Greenburg
Pearson
1999

Films


How to Read a Film: Motives, Media, Multimedia
James Monaco
Oxford University Press
2007
The Cinematic Imagination: Indian Popular Films as Social History
Jyotika Virdi
Permanent Black
2007
Bollywood: Sociology Goes to the Movies
Rajinder Kumar Dudrah
SAGE
2007
The History of Cinema For Beginners
Jarek Kupsc
Orient Longman
2006
A Dictionary of Film Terms: The Aesthetic Companion to Film
Art
Frank Eugene Beaver
 Peter Lang
2006
Our Films Their Films
Satyajit Ray
Orient Longman
1976


हिन्दी में इन्हें भी पढ़ा जा सकता है


Name of the book
Author
Publisher
Year
खबरें विस्तार से
श्याम कश्यप
राजकमल प्रकाशन
2008
टेलीविजन और क्राइमरिपोर्टिंग
वर्तिका नन्दा
राजकमल प्रकाशन
2010
पत्रकारिता की लक्ष्मणरेखा
आलोक मेहता
सामयिक प्रकाशन
2006
मीडिया की खबर
अरविंद मोहन
शिल्पायन
2008
टेलीविजन की भाषा
हरीश चन्द्र बर्णवाल
राधाकृष्ण
2011
टेलीविजन की कहानी
श्याम कश्यपऔर  मुकेश कुमार
राजकमल प्रकाशन
2008